Which restaurant delivery rules apply in the time of coronavirus?

March 20, 2020 00:11:45
Which restaurant delivery rules apply in the time of coronavirus?
Extra Serving
Which restaurant delivery rules apply in the time of coronavirus?
/

Hosted By

Holly Petre Sam Oches

Show Notes

Coronavirus has forced many restaurants to move to off-premise. States are changing regulations for restaurants, making them close dine-in operations and pivot to delivery, takeout or drive-thru. This has prompted third-party delivery companies like GrubHub, Postmates, Seamless, DoorDash and UberEats to taking remove delivery fees for consumers, but what does it all mean for restaurants? Nation’s Restaurant News senior editor Gloria Dawson wrote a comprehensive overview of the third-party delivery marketplaces in the midst of the coronavirus. Which fees are they waiving? Which are they still imposing? What new players have entered the game? We could only cover so much in this week’s podcast, so be sure to read her entire roundup here. There has long been a debate between third-party delivery services and restaurants over fees, some of which can reach 30%, and earlier in the week, the National Restaurant Association mentioned third-party delivery service fees in its proposed legislation to the White House. A bright spot was Tock, owned by Nick Kokonas, a co-founder of award-winning Alinea Chicago. Within six days of client Canalis’ request, Tock transformed from a reservation platform to a delivery service, helping fine-dining restaurants that never offered delivery before reach customers on lockdown. So, what’s really going on with these services in the time of coronavirus? Gloria and I attempt to peel back all the layers and give a clear picture of how it all stands right now.

Episode Transcript

No transcript available...

Other Episodes

Episode 3

June 23, 2021 00:15:02
Episode Cover

Tim McEnery on the continued diversification of Cooper’s Hawk Winery & Restaurant

One of few full-service brands to report both sales and unit growth in 2020, Cooper’s Hawk Winery & Restaurants began positioning itself as a lifestyle brand with multiple revenue streams long before the pandemic. The full-service restaurant and wine bar is also part wine maker. The brand has a wine club with more than half a million members, who have access to monthly wine dinners and group trips to travel to wine-making regions of the world. That diversification built around a loyal fan base was a driving factor for Cooper’s Hawk’s success through 2020, when the Downer’s Grove, Ill.-based chain recorded sales of $385.4 million, up 12.5%, according to Datassential’s Firefly 500 report. Founder and CEO Tim McEnery said the chain was forced to pivot during the pandemic, like most restaurants across the country. “Our operators became good at opening and closing the restaurants, so it was great for me that they were handling that aspect of the business so I could help navigate a way out of it for us,” he said. About six months into the pandemic, he said the company made some big decisions. “We were going to grab ahold of our future,” said McEnery. “We started investing in talent, technology, digital, data warehousing, really everything that would help Cooper’s Hawk live up to its potential over these next few years.” Hear McEnery look back on those decisions and how they have set the brand up for more-accelerated growth this year and beyond. ...

Listen

Episode

January 27, 2022 00:09:35
Episode Cover

Nicole West grows Chipotle’s digital sales with relentless focus on customer experience

Leading Chipotle's effort as vice president of digital strategy and product is Nicole West, one of few female leaders in the restaurant tech world. ...

Listen

Episode

February 19, 2022 00:46:24
Episode Cover

Amy Alarcon of Popeyes on that chicken sandwich

This week on the Extra Serving podcast, a production of Nation’s Restaurant News’ Last Bite Network, NRN editors Holly Petre, Sam Oches and Bret Thorn discussed Popeyes’ year-over-year sales decline after an epic 2020.   “Even though the headline is that their sales were down, I have to imagine they’re not too disappointed because it seems like there were a lot of external factors like labor that’s primarily at fault here,” Oches said on the podcast.   The team, meeting in person at NRN’s New York City headquarters, sampled the famous chicken sandwich (as seen below on video) and discussed its merits while also analyzing Popeyes’ massive 2020 in comparison to 2021 following the brand’s fourth quarter earnings.   The big headline from all of Restaurant Brands International’s earnings, however, was that Burger King is raising menu prices. The team discusses how rising menu prices at quick-service versus fast-casual restaurants during this time of inflation will impact customer expectations for these segments.   Plus, Thorn interviewed Amy Alarcon, the vice president of culinary innovation at Popeyes about that sandwich and new menu innovations at the chicken chain. ...

Listen