The Power List: Steph So works to humanize the digital experience at Shake Shack

January 20, 2022 00:11:45
The Power List: Steph So works to humanize the digital experience at Shake Shack
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The Power List: Steph So works to humanize the digital experience at Shake Shack
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Hosted By

Holly Petre Sam Oches

Show Notes

How the digital head at the burger restaurant is making sure customers are engaged with the brand and glad about it

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