&pizza CEO Michael Lastoria and Dejah Foxx on innovation, company culture and the events of 2020

March 12, 2021 00:21:43
&pizza CEO Michael Lastoria and Dejah Foxx on innovation, company culture and the events of 2020
Extra Serving
&pizza CEO Michael Lastoria and Dejah Foxx on innovation, company culture and the events of 2020
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Hosted By

Holly Petre Sam Oches

Show Notes

&Pizza has long been ahead of the curve on technology, but in 2020, the fast-casual chain made sure it was ahead of its competitors in terms of diversity, inclusion and political activism. The pizza chain -- helmed by founder and CEO Michael Lastoria -- held nothing back in 2020. We named Lastoria to our 2021 Power List for steps the brand took in 2020 to rise above the pack, including their advocacy for a $15-per-hour minimum wage, diversity and inclusion, and political activism, from serving pizzas to voters waiting in line to closing shops on Election Day to allow employees the time to vote. As part of our 2021 Power List, the chosen executives were asked to choose someone at their company who was the future and showed leadership. Lastoria chose &pizza’s youngest store manager, 20-year-old Dejah Foxx. The following conversation between Lastoria and Foxx showcases the immense talent pool at &pizza and how investing in young employees is the future for foodservice companies.

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