NRN editors discuss restaurant unions, the Boston Market walkout, celebrity endorsements and the sale of Velvet Taco

December 03, 2021 00:58:10
NRN editors discuss restaurant unions, the Boston Market walkout, celebrity endorsements and the sale of Velvet Taco
Extra Serving
NRN editors discuss restaurant unions, the Boston Market walkout, celebrity endorsements and the sale of Velvet Taco
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Hosted By

Holly Petre Sam Oches

Show Notes

This week on the Extra Serving podcast, Holly Petre, Sam Oches and Bret Thorn discussed the re-emergence of unions in the restaurant industry. The latest news comes from Tudors Biscuit World, a W. Va.-based chain where workers in one unit claimed managers called the police when they attempted to call a meeting to discuss majority union support. And the Starbucks unionization attempts at several upstate New York locations have seen increased tensions between the unions and the chain ahead of next week’s vote.

Also, the team talked about the Thanksgiving Boston Market walkout and what it means for the restaurant industry. Is this a symptom of the labor situation across restaurants, and do other chains need to pay attention? Will this bring about better working conditions? Find out what the NRN editors think in the episode.

Finally, the NRN editors discussed the sale of Velvet Taco. The fast-casual taco chain was sold earlier this week, but the team was more interested in talking about what a cool brand Velvet Taco is and the growing chain’s potential. That lead to a conversation about celebrity endorsements in the restaurant industry related to Velvet Taco’s marketing.

Also in this episode, hear an interview with the dietician and executive chef of Woworks, Katie Cavuto, where she talks about the benefits of exhaling.

Also, here’s a link to Bret’s “meat sweats” mentioned in the podcast if you want to experience it firsthand.

Episode Transcript

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