NRN editors discuss CKE’s rebrand, restaurant chain earnings, Raising Cane’s culture

May 13, 2022 00:58:59
NRN editors discuss CKE’s rebrand, restaurant chain earnings, Raising Cane’s culture
Extra Serving
NRN editors discuss CKE’s rebrand, restaurant chain earnings, Raising Cane’s culture
/

Hosted By

Holly Petre Sam Oches

Show Notes

This week on the Extra Serving podcast, a product of Nation’s Restaurant News, NRN editors Holly Petre, Sam Oches, Leigh Anne Zinsmeister and Bret Thorn spoke about the upcoming CKE rebranding efforts, which will cost half a billion dollars. 

CKE Restaurants — parent to the Carl’s Jr. and Hardee’s quick-service chains — earlier this week announced a $500 million rebranding that will focus on the exterior of its restaurants, because most customers are interacting with the brand via the exterior and not the interior. Stay tuned to the Extra Serving feed in the next few weeks to hear an exclusive interview with Owen Klein, the vice president of global culinary innovation for CKE. 

Also, the team discussed the week in restaurant earnings. There were fewer earnings reports than last week, but it was still jam-packed with financials from fast-casual companies like Shake Shack and Sweetgreen and full-service brands like First Watch and Texas Roadhouse. First Watch, as Zinsmeister pointed out on the podcast, was one of the only chains in 2021 not to increase menu prices. It did increased menu prices early in 2022, which is paying off as same-store sales soared in Q1.

Zinsmeister also gives a recap of her recent trip to Baton Rouge, La., where she spent 24 hours fully immersed in quick-service Raising Cane’s unique culture.

Lastly, this week’s interview is Felton Jones, the head roaster of PJ's Coffee. Thorn and Jones spoke about the intricacies of coffee and the chain’s newest flavor, Wedding Cake.

View Full Transcript

Episode Transcript

No transcript available...

Other Episodes

Episode

October 15, 2021 00:40:43

Dr. James Pogue on diversity

This week on Extra Serving, NRN editors discussed Domino’s first domestic same-store sales dip in a decade. More than anything, it’s a sign of the exceptional numbers the chain saw in 2020, as this most recent quarter was 15% up over 2019. Also, McDonald’s is finally testing its plant-based burger in the U.S. The NRN editors discuss what this means for the brand that has notoriously refused to release a plant-based burger “until customers asked for it,” and how it compares to the launch of Burger King’s Impossible Whopper. Lastly, the team discusses Megan Thee Stallion’s investment in Popeyes as a franchisee and the history of musicians and athletes becoming franchisees of restaurant companies. What does it mean that a celebrity is being so vocal about their involvement in a restaurant franchise? Listen to the editors share their thoughts in this episode.  Finally, Extra Serving wraps with two interviews. The first is with Dr. James Pogue, an expert on diversity, equity and inclusion. Dr. Pogue spoke at CREATE on a panel about diversity in the workplace and we caught up with him just after the panel to get some more thoughts on the topic. Then, NRN senior food and beverage editor Bret Thorn spoke with Dontre’al Haigler, Denny’s product development chef, about what it’s like to be a corporate chef versus going to culinary school and becoming a working kitchen chef.  Also this week on the Last Bite Network, a production of Nation’s Restaurant News and Restaurant Hospitality… Take-Away with Sam Oches aired a mini episode with Damola Adamolekun, CEO of P.F. Chang’s, and another mini episode with Joe Guith, president of Focus Brands. Both were recorded live at CREATE and have interesting ...

Listen

Episode

January 08, 2021 00:13:32
Episode Cover

Kelly Roddy, CEO of SaladWorks on the brand's expansion and recent acquisitions

Following the announcement on Tuesday of SaladWorks’ acquisition of fast-casual brands Garbanzo Mediterranean Fresh and Frutta Bowls, Nation’s Restaurant News sat down with Kelly Roddy, CEO of SaladWorks to discuss the acquisition of the smaller brands. Roddy discussed how when they decided to acquire both brands — Frutta Bowls before the pandemic, and Garbanzo after it began — it was very important to them to stay within the “DNA” of their health and wellness-focused food brand: “It's tempting to go after those segments that have been hot during the pandemic,” Roddy said, discussing how other companies have snapped up chicken and pizza brands. “But we believe customers are definitely going to be looking for products that are good for you and that food is fuel for your body. And if your brand isn't aligned with that, then that's not a brand that we were looking to bring into the portfolio.” So what’s next for the newly formed restaurant company, Woworks if they’re not looking to acquire brands known for indulgent foods? Look for more expansion of Garbanzo and Frutta Bowls in new markets, as well as new SaladWorks locations too: “We're definitely very focused on non-traditional locations [for Garbanzo and Frutta Bowls],” Roddy said. “We’re looking at digital-based units, so a lot of ghost kitchens, food halls, etc. There’s a huge opportunity to get the brand out much quicker through some of these more non-traditional venues.” ...

Listen

Episode

May 01, 2020 00:46:35
Episode Cover

Taziki’s CEO is adapting his brand to serve three types of guests in a post-COVID-19 world

Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, Taziki’s Mediterranean Café spent a year beta testing how two types of delivery programs: do it yourself, or third-party. CEO Dan Simpson tested both ways and came to the conclusion that both proved valuable depending on the scenario. But, now the delivery landscape has completely changed under shelter-at-home orders across the U.S. That has forced brands like Taziki’s to re-think their off premise playbook to survive what will certainly be a months long recovery -- where only the most nimble and cash rich restaurants will survive. At Birmingham, Ala.-based Taziki’s, that means expanding third-party operators, who he’s found are easier to negotiate during the pandemic. That wasn’t the case before, and he’ll explain why in our podcast. He’s also seeing a new business model emerge for the fast-casual brand of 93 units: Curbside pickup. Will consumers demand more contactless ordering systems like curbside and delivery as they maintain social distancing practices in a post COVID-19 world? “That's a big crystal ball question,” Simpson said. “The same guests are out there. It's just about meeting them where they are and adjusting our business models to where [if] that means more curbside or more delivery, we can do that.” As we spoke, Simpson and franchisees were preparing to reopen dining rooms at some restaurants in Georgia, Tennessee and South Carolina. Listen to what Simpson has to say on how that new normal might look. ...

Listen