Dr. James Pogue on diversity

October 15, 2021 00:40:43
Dr. James Pogue on diversity
Extra Serving
Dr. James Pogue on diversity
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Hosted By

Holly Petre Sam Oches

Show Notes

This week on Extra Serving, NRN editors discussed Domino’s first domestic same-store sales dip in a decade. More than anything, it’s a sign of the exceptional numbers the chain saw in 2020, as this most recent quarter was 15% up over 2019.

Also, McDonald’s is finally testing its plant-based burger in the U.S. The NRN editors discuss what this means for the brand that has notoriously refused to release a plant-based burger “until customers asked for it,” and how it compares to the launch of Burger King’s Impossible Whopper.

Lastly, the team discusses Megan Thee Stallion’s investment in Popeyes as a franchisee and the history of musicians and athletes becoming franchisees of restaurant companies. What does it mean that a celebrity is being so vocal about their involvement in a restaurant franchise? Listen to the editors share their thoughts in this episode. 

Finally, Extra Serving wraps with two interviews. The first is with Dr. James Pogue, an expert on diversity, equity and inclusion. Dr. Pogue spoke at CREATE on a panel about diversity in the workplace and we caught up with him just after the panel to get some more thoughts on the topic. Then, NRN senior food and beverage editor Bret Thorn spoke with Dontre’al Haigler, Denny’s product development chef, about what it’s like to be a corporate chef versus going to culinary school and becoming a working kitchen chef. 

Also this week on the Last Bite Network, a production of Nation’s Restaurant News and Restaurant Hospitality…

Take-Away with Sam Oches aired a mini episode with Damola Adamolekun, CEO of P.F. Chang’s, and another mini episode with Joe Guith, president of Focus Brands. Both were recorded live at CREATE and have interesting insights with the executives.

Oches will be back next week with a regular episode of that podcast featuring Luke Holden, founder and CEO of Luke’s Lobster. 

In the Kitchen with Bret Thorn this week featured restaurateur Sam Fox. Thorn and Fox spoke about Fox’s history and his role as an employee after so many years as being entrepreneur and boss.

Episode Transcript

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