CEO of Joe and the Juice Thomas Nørøxe on the brand's stateside growth

October 22, 2021 00:40:25
CEO of Joe and the Juice Thomas Nørøxe on the brand's stateside growth
Extra Serving
CEO of Joe and the Juice Thomas Nørøxe on the brand's stateside growth
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Hosted By

Holly Petre Sam Oches

Show Notes

This week, NRN editors Holly Petre, Joanna Fantozzi and editor in chief Sam Oches discussed In-N-Out’s stance on vaccine mandates. Last week, the chain was forced to close its only San Francisco store by health inspectors after refusing customers entry who could not provide proof of vaccination, a San Francisco law. The chain’s lawyers responded, leaving the very private company open to criticism over its vaccination stance where it refused to police its customers.

Also, the team discussed the announcement from McDonald’s that the corporate team had achieved equal pay across all genders and ethnicities. What does this mean for the rest of the industry? Well, as Sam Oches put it “by the time McDonald’s is doing something, everybody should follow suit.”

Lastly, the team covered Joanna Fantozzi’s story on how companies are coping with the labor crisis which can be found here. They discussed the creative ways some restaurants are coming up with solutions and what restaurants can do to attract more employees during this crisis.

For this week’s interview, Fantozzi spoke with the CEO of Joe and the Juice about the chain’s upcoming national expansion.

Episode Transcript

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